50 Essential Linux Commands that You Should Know

Originally published at: 50 Essential Linux Commands that You Should Know

In this blog post, I will list 50 essential Linux commands you need to know to manage Linux systems effectively. These commands will help you perform various tasks efficiently. This post is a follow-up to my previous blog post: 90 frequently used Linux Commands. However, it’s designed to provide you with a carefully categorized list…

Feel free to add any additional commands in the comments.

For example:
useradd and usermod:

The useradd command is used to create a new user account. When used with appropriate options, it can set the user’s home directory, shell, user ID, group ID, and other properties. For example, the command sudo useradd -m -s /bin/bash john creates a new user account called “john” with a home directory and sets the default shell to bash.

The usermod command is used to modify an existing user account. It can be used to change the user’s home directory, default shell, user ID, group ID, and other properties. For example, the command sudo usermod -a -G www-data john adds the user “john” to the “www-data” group, giving them access to web server files and directories.

It’s important to note that both of these commands require root privileges to run, which means they must be run with the sudo command or as the root user.

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One thing that has always baffled me is how to find the groups a user is part of. Then I figured out groups username was how and I felt like such a `tard. next thing you know I’ll forget what dcpromo does in Windows…ugh

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Prompted by this article, I read up on the difference between CTRL-C and CTRL-Z. The latter will suspend a task on the command line rather than aborting it, after which you can resume it in the foreground with fg, or in the background with bg.

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I compared the /boot/ directories in the file system structure image shown and on my Raspberry Pi OS Bookworm (as well as it’s alternative /boot/firmware/ directory) and found no matches. Is the screenshot out of date, or just related to a different Linux flavour?

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